Seminar Series: Just Deserts? Earnings Inequality and Bargaining Power in the U.S. Economy (Invitation Only)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted Nancy Folbre, Professor Emerita of Economics at the University of Massachusettes Amherst, for a seminar on economics rents, rent-seeking activities, and their influence on labor market outcomes. If you would like to read the paper, you can find it here.

The seminar took place on November 18, 2016 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

This event was the latest installment of our monthly academic seminar series, which aims to elevate important new research on issues related to whether and how economic inequality impacts economic growth. It was hosted at our offices in Washington, DC.

The seminar series is by invitation only. For questions, please contact Casey Schoeneberger at cschoeneberger@equitablegrowth.org.

Fighting the Next Recession

The Great Recession officially ended in June 2009 and the current recovery is still ongoing, yet economists believe that the next recession is likely to occur before the start of the next decade. In the wake of the Great Recession and the slow uptick in wages and job growth, how can past monetary, fiscal, and safety-net policymaking outcomes inform the response to next economic downturn? Which recession-fighting tools need to be re-examined in light of the high levels of income and wealth inequality in the United States?

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth on Tuesday, November 15th organized a keynote address from former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers exploring these questions in light of the structural changes at work in the U.S. economy. After the keynote, policymakers and academics who served during the Great Recession and studied the subsequent impacts of the downturn discussed what questions current policymakers and researchers must address before the next recession occurs.

Keynote Address

Lawrence H. Summers, Harvard University

Panel I: Lessons from the Last Recession

This panel looked back at the efforts to fight the Great Recession in order to glean lessons for the next effort to halt an economic downturn.

Panel II: Fiscal Policy during the Next Recession

When the next recession hits, what should be the role of fiscal policy? How large should a stimulus be? Where should the spending be targeted? This panel considered these questions and more.

Panel III: Monetary Policy during the Next Recession

How can and should the Federal Reserve react the next time the U.S. economy enters a recession? Panelists considered the best course of action in a period of permanently low interest rates.

Panel IV: Reforming the Safety Net for the Next Recession

This panel considered how the social safety net can be reformed to better act as an automatic stabilizer, injecting demand into the economy during the next recession.

A conversation on risks of recession in the near future with Olivier Blanchard and Ryan Avent

A conversation about the risks for the next recession, how likely it may be, and the forces that may cause it.

For any questions, please contact events@equitablegrowth.org.

Making Antitrust Work for the 21st Century

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted a conversation on exploring the impacts of antitrust enforcement and increasing market concentration on economic growth and inequality.

Prominent academics and practitioners highlighted the changes in antitrust policy over the past 40 years and examine areas in need of further research moving forward. Following the panel discussion, Commissioner Terrell McSweeny of the Federal Trade Commission delivered keynote remarks.

For any questions, please contact events@equitablegrowth.org.

Watch the keynote remarks below:

Full videos of the event:

Opening remarks

Heather Boushey, Executive Director, Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Panel on “Antitrust in 2016” 

Moderator:  Diane Bartz, antitrust reporter, Reuters

Panelists:

  • John E. Kwoka, Neal F. Finnegan Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University
  • Barry Lynn, Director of the Open Markets program at New America Foundation
  • Fiona Scott Morton, Theodore Nierenberg Professor of Economics at the Yale University School of Management

Panel on “Economics of Antitrust”

Moderator: Heather Boushey, Executive Director, Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Panelists:

  • Jonathan Baker, Professor of Law at American University
  • Martin Gaynor, E.J. Barone Professor of Economics and Health Policy at Carnegie Mellon University
  • Marc Jarsulic, Vice President of Economic Policy at the Center for American Progress

Keynote Remarks

Commissioner Terrell McSweeny, Federal Trade Commission

Seminar Series: Profit shifting on the corporate tax base in the United States (Invitation Only)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted Professor Kim Clausing of Reed College for a seminar on her research investigating the effects of profit shifting on the corporate tax base in the United States. If you would like to read the paper, you can find it here. The seminar took place on September 12, 2016 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

This event was the latest installment of our monthly academic seminar series, which aims to elevate important new research on issues related to whether and how economic inequality impacts economic growth. It was hosted at our offices in Washington, DC.

The seminar was by invitation only. For questions, please contact Casey Schoeneberger at cschoeneberger@equitablegrowth.org.

Seminar Series: Student loans and the labor market (Invitation Only)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted Equitable Growth grantee Stephanie Chapman, who recently completed her Ph.D. in economics at Northwestern University, for a seminar on her paper, “Student loans and the labor market: Evidence from merit aid programs.” The seminar took place on July 13 from 12:15 pm to 1:30 pm.

This event was an installment of our monthly academic seminar series, which aims to elevate important new research on issues related to whether and how economic inequality impacts economic growth. It was hosted at our offices in Washington, DC.

The seminar was by invitation only. For questions, please contact Casey Schoeneberger at cschoeneberger@equitablegrowth.org.

Join Us for Our First Equitable Growth Grantee Conference (Invitation Only)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted its inaugural grantee conference on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, in Washington, DC.  The conference was an opportunity for grantees to meet Equitable Growth staff, members of our Steering Committee, the policy community, and, importantly, each other.

Following the conference, Equitable Growth hosted a cocktail hour and dinner at Elizabeth’s on L (1341 L Street, NW, Washington, DC). The dinner included conference participants as well as members of the policy and funder communities, and select members of the press.

The conference and dinner were by invitation only. For questions, please contact Korin Davis at kdavis@equitablegrowth.org.

Seminar Series: Implications of economic inequality for women’s employment patterns (Invitation Only)

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth hosted Equitable Growth grantee Professor Philip Cohen of the University of Maryland for a seminar on the implications of economic inequality for women’s employment patterns on Tuesday, June 21 from 12:15 pm to 1:30 pm.

This event was an installment of our monthly academic seminar series, which aims to elevate important new research on issues related to whether and how economic inequality impacts economic growth. It was hosted at our offices in Washington, DC.

The seminar was by invitation only. For questions, please contact Casey Schoeneberger at cschoeneberger@equitablegrowth.org.

Branko Milanovic presents “Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization”

Please join the Washington Center for Equitable Growth on Tuesday, March 29 at 9:30a.m. for a presentation by Branko Milanovic on the findings of his new book, “Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization.”

“Global Inequality” is a comprehensive addition to the growing popular literature on inequality, expanding the scope of existing research in both time and space. Milanovic argues that inequality is historically not just an inverted-U shape, as Simon Kuznets claimed, nor a right-side-up U, as Thomas Piketty contends, but both.

The implications of Milanovic’s research for the current inequality debate pertain to the simultaneous decline of inequality between countries, as average incomes in the developing world grow rapidly, and the rise of inequality within countries, with the emergence of a global plutocracy and the stagnation or even decline of labor incomes for the middle class of developed economies. Milanovic connects all of these trends to the rise in globalization and pro-rich economic policies adopted around the world, and speculates about what sorts of forces might emerge to counteract the global trend, as they have in past periods.

Copies of “Global Inequality” will be available for purchase at the event.

Registration and breakfast: 9:00 a.m.
Presentation and discussion: 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

David Card and Alan Krueger on the 20th anniversary of ‘Myth and Measurement’ (Invite Only)

On Wednesday, March 16 at 9:30 a.m. Eastern, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and the Economic Policy Institute will host economists David Card and Alan Krueger for a 20th anniversary discussion of their seminal work, “Myth and Measurement.”

In “Myth and Measurement,” Card and Krueger used novel empirical methods to show how minimum wage increases improve living standards without necessarily leading to job losses. Card and Krueger will discuss how their work has influenced contemporary debates over raising the minimum wage and informed the development of empirical research in economics. EPI President Lawrence Mishel and Equitable Growth Executive Director Heather Boushey will provide comments.

This event is by invitation only. For questions, please contact Casey Schoeneberger at cschoeneberger@equitablegrowth.org.

 

Gabriel Zucman presents “Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens”

Please join the Washington Center for Equitable Growth for a presentation by Gabriel Zucman on the findings in his book, “Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens.”

Zucman offers an inventive and rigorous approach to quantifying how big the problem of tax havens are, how they work and are organized, and how we can begin to approach a solution. His research reveals that tax havens are quickly a growing danger to the world economy. In the past five years, the amount of wealth in tax havens has increased over twenty five percent – and there has never been as much money held offshore as there is today. Fighting the notion that any attempts to solve the tax haven problem are futile, since some countries will always offer more advantageous tax rates than others, as well as the counter-argument that after the financial crisis many countries have successfully fought tax evasion, Zucman argues that both sides are actually very wrong.

Hidden Wealth of Nations offers an ambitious agenda for reform, focused on ways in which countries can change the incentives of tax havens. The author argues that only by first understanding the extent of wealth held in secret can policymakers begin to address the problem.

Registration and breakfast: 8:30 a.m.
Presentation and panel: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.