Value Added – A blog

Our blog is the place where our staff and guest bloggers present clear, fact-based posts that make the connections between economic inequality and growth for the broad policy community and journalists based on the latest academic research.

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June 22, 2018
By Bridget Ansel,

Weekend reading “summer solstice” edition

This is a weekly post we publish on Fridays with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is the work we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope […]

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June 22, 2018
By Liz Hipple,

Inequality, mobility, and the American Dream

With the launch of our new website, we are reintroducing visitors to our policy issue areas. Informed by the academic research we fund, these issue areas are critical to our mission of advancing evidence-based ideas that promote strong, stable, and broad-based economic growth. Through the rest of June and early July, our expert staff are […]

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June 21, 2018
By Brad DeLong,

Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, June 15-21, 2018

Worthy reads on Equitable Growth: Very nice to see “Janet Yellen Joins Equitable Growth Steering Committee”. “There are few economists with the depth of academic and policymaking experience that Janet Yellen possesses,” said Heather Boushey, Equitable Growth’s executive director and chief economist. “She has worked tirelessly, in her research and in her high government positions, […]

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June 20, 2018
By Michael Kades,

Anticompetitive mergers: They are not just a threat to U.S. consumers anymore

A new working paper released today by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth suggests that consolidation among employers in the United States has created market power over their current and prospective employees and is contributing to lower wages. In “Anticompetitive Mergers in Labor Markets,” University of Pennsylvania economist Ioana Marinescu and University of Pennsylvania law […]

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June 15, 2018
By Nick Bunker,

Weekend reading: “Job-hopping Millennial” edition

This is a weekly post we publish on Fridays with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is the work we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope […]

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June 15, 2018
By Brad DeLong,

Unemployment and inflation once again…

The public discussion about inflation and unemployment appears to me to be substantially awry. It appears to incorporate two, and only two, lessons from history. The first of these lessons is that pushing the unemployment rate below the level corresponding to full employment leads to strong upward pressure on inflation. The second of these lessons […]

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June 14, 2018
By Brad DeLong,

Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, June 8-14, 2018

Worthy reads on Equitable Growth: The development of the idea that economics—labor economics especially—needs to focus more on power needs to be highlighted anew. Read our former colleague Ben Zipperer’s conversation with David Card and Alan Krueger: “Equitable Growth in Conversation: An interview with David Card and Alan Krueger.” Here’s Krueger in the interview: “I […]

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June 14, 2018
By Greg Leiserson,

U.S. tax policy for equitable growth

Tax policy is an important tool for improving economic performance and ensuring that the benefits of economic growth are broadly shared. Taxes support the living standards of the American public by providing the revenues necessary to pay for public investment in children, families, and infrastructure, for social insurance and safety net programs, for national defense, and for many other public programs that support our quality of life. Taxes also affect the choices people make in both positive and negative ways and, as a result, influence the level and distribution of income, consumption, wealth, and broader measures of economic well-being.