Grant

Distributional consequences of changes in labor demand and amenities: Evidence from linked census data

Project Summary:

This project will explore the distributional implications of fracking and mass transit expansions, two important recent developments in U.S. cities and regions. Using newly available, restricted access, longitudinal U.S. Census Bureau microdata, the researcher seeks to answer: If fracking or urban rail expansions have heterogenous effects? How much do local housing costs rise? And do fracking or rail expansions lead to displacement of original residents? Policymakers are searching for policies to encourage growth in American cities, and we see this project as providing insightful and generalizable findings in that area.

Biography

Alexander Bartik is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include labor economics, public finance, and applied econometrics. He has worked as a research assistant at the Brookings Institution as well as for Professors Dave Donaldson and Joseph Altonji. He received a B.A. in Ethics, Politics, and Economics from Yale University.